Entertainment

Spacey ‘seeking treatment’ after harassment claim

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On Monday, actor Anthony Rapp claimed Spacey had made a sexual advance toward him in 1985, when Rapp was just 14-years-old and Spacey was 26.

The House of Cards actor said in a statement that he does “not remember the encounter”, but said he was “beyond horrified to hear his story”.

“But if I did behave then as he describes, I owe him the sincerest apology,” Spacey added.

He then addressed rumours about his sexuality, saying he now “chooses to live as a gay man”.

:: Is Kevin Spacey using his sexuality as a PR spin?

speak onstage during the ___ panel during 2017 New York Comic Con - Day 3 at Theater at Madison Square Gardenon October 7, 2017 in New York City.
Image:Anthony Rapp said the actor made a sexual advance when he was 17-year-old

A statement from Spacey’s representatives said: “Kevin Spacey is taking the time necessary to seek evaluation and treatment. No other information is available at this time.”

Roberto Cavazos, who worked with Spacey at the Old Vic, said he expected “a whole lot more” accusations in coming days.

“It seems the only requirement was to be a male under the age of 30 for Mr Spacey to feel free to touch us,” the Mexican actor wrote.

:: Peter Tatchell: Spacey’s gayness is irrelevant now

Kevin Spacey
Image:Kevin Spacey apologised for his behaviour but said he didn’t remember it

“I also had a couple of unpleasant encounters with Spacey which were on the verge of being called harassment,” he added.

The Old Vic theatre said it was “deeply dismayed” by the allegations against Spacey, adding “no complaints” had been made towards the actor during his time there or after he had left.

Since the claims emerged, Netflix suspended the filming of the House of Cards series, and Spacey’s 2017 Emmy Founders Award was revoked.

Jeremy Piven is accused of groping an actress
Image:Jeremy Piven is accused of groping an actress

Allegations against Spacey come in the wake of the scandal hitting Harvey Weinstein.

Since then, several claims have been made against Hollywood actors and directors, including Jeremy Piven and Dustin Hoffman.

Piven, 52, has denied allegations that he groped actress Ariane Bellamar, on the set of Entourage and at the Playboy mansion.

Hoffman, now 80, said he felt “terrible” after Anna Graham Hunter claimed he had groped her and spoken to her about sex while she was a 17-year-old production assistant on one of his film sets.

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‘How I dressed the stars for murder’

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Meet the designer behind the costumes on the new big screen version of the Agatha Christie classic, Murder on the Orient Express.

Alexandra Byrne told BBC News who was her favourite cast member to dress.

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Maisie Williams ‘can’t wait to be free of Game of Thrones’

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Maisie Williams says she’s looking forward to Game of Thrones finishing so she can spend more time making independent films.

She’s told Newsbeat that the thought of not being in the series is “nerve wracking” but she can’t wait to be “free”.

The actress has played Arya Stark in the HBO fantasy drama since the first series, when she was 14.

She’s now 20, and the series is heading into its eighth and final season.

Although filming for that hasn’t begun yet and fans are desperate to find out when it’ll be released, the cast have done their first script read-through.

Maisie Williams

Maisie says she has been enjoying some time off set before things get intense again.

“Anytime I get to work from home, is downtime,” she says. “I think if you stop and do nothing, it drives you insane. Well it does to me anyway.

“I’ve been lucky enough to be home for a whole month now, which has been wonderful.”

Maisie Williams as Ashildr in Doctor Who

Image caption Maisie Williams played Ashildr in Doctor Who episode Face the Raven

So what will the star do with her time when the series that has dominated her career comes to an end?

“I’ve just started a production company, so I’m now realising how hard the industry can be.

“Coming back here and listening to all the films nominated and getting back into watching independent films just makes me realise how much I miss it.

“It’s the only place I’ve ever really wanted to be to be honest.”

Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams

Image caption Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams play sisters Sansa and Arya Stark in Game of Thrones

Maisie announced the nominees for the British Independent Film Awards on Wednesday, and says she’s really interested in independent films.

“I’m really excited for Game of Thrones to finish and there’s going to be time for me to do whatever I want.

“That’s just incredibly exciting and it will be nice to pick roles that I want to do.

“I can show the world what sort of actress I want to be and shape my career a little bit.”

Next year Maisie will be in X-Men: The New Mutants, following in the footsteps of her Game of Thrones co-star and best friend Sophie Turner.

“On one hand it’s really nerve wracking to know that I won’t have that support blanket and safety net, but on the other hand I’m free.

“I’d love to do a British independent film, I’d love to make it and I’d love to be in it. There are a couple of directors that I’d love to work with – Dexter Fletcher being one.

“I’d like to just do some work here, for Britain.”

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The Lion King: Beyonce confirms role in remake

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Beyonce on stage at the Grammys in FebruaryImage copyrightGetty Images
Image caption Beyonce posted the cast list on social media

US singer Beyonce is to take a lead role in the remake of Disney’s The Lion King.

She will voice the role of lioness Nala, next to lead character Simba, played by Donald Glover.

Beyonce used Facebook to confirm her long-rumoured involvement in the project.

Her other co-stars include Chiwetel Ejiofor as Scar and Seth Rogan as Pumba the warthog. James Earl Jones will play Mufasa, as he did in the 1994 original.

Skip Twitter post by @Disney

#TheLionKing. 2019. 🦁👑 pic.twitter.com/UMJo18FwDt

— Disney (@Disney) November 1, 2017

End of Twitter post by @Disney

British comedian John Oliver has also been cast as Zazu, the hornbill voiced by Rowan Atkinson in the first film.

The film is being conceived along the same lines as another recent remake, The Jungle Book, which also saw big names voicing photorealistic computer-generated animals.

It is scheduled for release in July 2019 and will be directed by Jon Favreau, who also led The Jungle Book reboot.

In a statement, he said: “It is a director’s dream to assemble a talented team like this to bring this classic story to life.”

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The new Taylor Swift?

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Kelsea BalleriniImage copyrightSony Music / Black River
Image caption Kelsea Ballerini: “I grew up on a farm in Eastern Tennessee and country is where my roots are”

Earlier this year, Kelsea Ballerini got to go to the Grammys for the first time.

The 24-year-old was up for best new artist, and scheduled to perform with Lukas Graham – but she was still a little star-struck.

“My mum was my date – and we were both sitting there fan-girling like, ‘Oh my God, that’s Adele! Don’t look! Don’t look!'”

Ballerini, it turns out, is not the sort of person who keeps her cool when she meets an idol.

“The first time I met Carrie Underwood was at the Opry, before I had a record deal,” she recalls.

“I was waiting backstage with a bunch of people to say hello and finally it was my turn.

“I was going to say something normal – but then I saw her and went “Girl! You got so much sooouul!”.

“Of all the things I could have said, that’s what I chose,” she grimaces. “It was very weird.”

Image copyrightGetty Images
Image caption The singer promised her mum, Carla, she’d take her to the Grammys when she was 13 years old

Awkward celebrity encounters aside, Ballerini has been living in a fairytale for the last few years.

She released her debut album, The First Time, in 2015 and watched its first three singles go to number one on Billboard’s country airplay chart – an historic achievement for a female artist.

The bubbly, vivacious melodies and autobiographical lyrics of Love Me Like You Mean It and Peter Pan won comparisons to Taylor Swift, who quickly befriended the artist (she calls Ballerini her “little sis”) and invited her onto her 1989 world tour.

That led to her Grammy appearance and, at next week’s Country Music Association Awards, a nomination for female artist of the year.

All told, it’s turned out pretty well for someone who was shunned by the establishment when she first arrived in Nashville.

Skip Instagram post by kelseaballerini

cats and coffee and cooking and @taylorswift.

A post shared by Kelsea Ballerini (@kelseaballerini) on Jan 26, 2016 at 6:49am PST

End of Instagram post by kelseaballerini

“I could not get into a room with a hit writer to save my life,” she recalls of making her first album.

“I was a new girl, on an independent label and those were two strikes against me. No-one would write with me.”

It turned out to be a blessing. Left to her own devices, Ballerini, whose first concert was Britney Spears, channelled her love of pop and R&B into the album, giving her songs a vitality and immediacy that’s sometimes missing from traditional country.

The star’s co-producer, Forest Glen Whitehead, even refers to her as a “country Beyonce”.

“I grew up on a farm in Eastern Tennessee and country is where my roots are,” explains the singer, “but I listen to rap and I listen to R&B and I love pop.

“I’ve always been open about that because, as a songwriter, I always want to make sure that I’m trying new things.”

Image copyrightSony Music / Black River
Image caption The singer moved to Nashville aged 15 with her mother but struggled to be accepted by the country music establishment

Despite the strength of her singles, Ballerini still faced an uphill struggle in the insular world of country.

Her debut came out in the midst of what’s been called “tomato-gate“, where radio consultant Keith Hill advised stations not to play too many songs by women and not to play two women back to back.

“If you want to make ratings in country radio, take females out,” he told trade publication Country Radio Aircheck. “They’re just not the lettuce in our salad. The lettuce is Luke Bryan and Blake Shelton, Keith Urban and artists like that. The tomatoes of our salad are the females.”

Like many others, Ballerini was perplexed by his comments.

“When you think of country music history obviously you have George Jones, Garth Brooks, George Strait – all these iconic males. But you cannot talk about the history of country music without Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton, Shania Twain. I mean some of the biggest artists in country music history are female.”

In the end, she thinks, the uproar over Hill’s comments helped her cause.

“Love Me Like You Mean It was in the top five when tomato-gate came out – and I think radio stations went, ‘Well, watch this!’ and helped me get to number one.”

Image copyrightGetty Images

But how do you follow up such a successful debut? With great difficulty, says Ballerini.

“I didn’t know how to make my second record for a long time.

“The first one worked so well that I was like, ‘How do I make that record again?’ And then I realised I can’t. That’s not who I am any more.”

The answer was simple: Write an album about the person she’s become – and luckily Ballerini had a lot of material to draw on.

No more love songs?

Unapologetically, released this Friday, is the chronological story of the last two years, as the singer left behind a “gross break-up” and got engaged to fellow country singer Morgan Evans.

One of the first tracks is Miss Me More, a slinky stomp in which the singer describes how her ex-boyfriend slowly eroded her identity.

I retired my red lipstick ’cause you said you didn’t like it,” she sings. “I didn’t wear my high heel shoes / ‘Cause I couldn’t be taller than you.”

“In a lot of young relationships, you fall in love for the first time and you give every part of yourself to make it work,” she explains. “But sometimes, when it’s not treated right, that’s how you lose yourself.

“I think it’s really a beautiful moment when you get to the other side, and you’re looking in the mirror and you’re like, ‘Huh, I thought I was going to miss him but – actually – I miss me!'”

Image copyrightGetty Images
Image caption Ballerini will duet with Reba McIntyre at next week’s CMA Awards

Ballerini says she found it easier to write those “super dark” lyrics than the love songs that close the album. In fact, she’s so bad at the soppy stuff that she came up with a track called I Hate Love Songs.

A pastiche of saccharine 1950s doo-wop hits, it opens with the lyric: “I hate Shakespeare and Gosling and cakes with white frosting.”

“Do I really hate Ryan Gosling? Lord no!” she screeches. “He’s a beautiful man!

“But I love that song. It talks about that heart and head battle. I don’t want to be a cliched person in love; but I kind of am turning into that.

“Then the next song [on the album] is Unapologetically, where it’s finally like I’m fully in love. I love the tension of those two together.”

With its pop leanings and infectiously catchy choruses, Unapologetically looks destined to bring Ballerini to a wider audience – and the UK in particular.

Lead single Legends has been playlisted by BBC Radio 2, while the singer is booked to play the Country to Country festival in London and Glasgow next March.

She’ll also perform a duet with country legend Reba McIntyre (“it’s going to be so cool”) at the CMA Awards, which will be screened later in the month on BBC Four.

Just don’t expect Ballerini to stop being star-struck as her own star rises.

“I still freak out when I’m around Carrie Underwood,” she laughs, “and now I see her all the time.”

Unapologetically is released on Friday, 3 November. Highlights of the CMA Awards will be broadcast on BBC Radio 2 on Sunday, 11 November and later in the month on BBC Four.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

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Meet the singer Taylor Swift calls ‘little sis’

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Kelsea BalleriniImage copyrightSony Music / Black River
Image caption Kelsea Ballerini: “I grew up on a farm in Eastern Tennessee and country is where my roots are”

Earlier this year, Kelsea Ballerini got to go to the Grammys for the first time.

The 24-year-old was up for best new artist, and scheduled to perform with Lukas Graham – but she was still a little star-struck.

“My mum was my date – and we were both sitting there fan-girling like, ‘Oh my God, that’s Adele! Don’t look! Don’t look!'”

Ballerini, it turns out, is not the sort of person who keeps her cool when she meets an idol.

“The first time I met Carrie Underwood was at the Opry, before I had a record deal,” she recalls.

“I was waiting backstage with a bunch of people to say hello and finally it was my turn.

“I was going to say something normal – but then I saw her and went “Girl! You got so much sooouul!”.

“Of all the things I could have said, that’s what I chose,” she grimaces. “It was very weird.”

Image copyrightGetty Images
Image caption The singer promised her mum, Carla, she’d take her to the Grammys when she was 13 years old

Awkward celebrity encounters aside, Ballerini has been living in a fairytale for the last few years.

She released her debut album, The First Time, in 2015 and watched its first three singles go to number one on Billboard’s country airplay chart – an historic achievement for a female artist.

The bubbly, vivacious melodies and autobiographical lyrics of Love Me Like You Mean It and Peter Pan won comparisons to Taylor Swift, who quickly befriended the artist (she calls Ballerini her “little sis”) and invited her onto her 1989 world tour.

That led to her Grammy appearance and, at next week’s Country Music Association Awards, a nomination for female artist of the year.

All told, it’s turned out pretty well for someone who was shunned by the establishment when she first arrived in Nashville.

Skip Instagram post by kelseaballerini

cats and coffee and cooking and @taylorswift.

A post shared by Kelsea Ballerini (@kelseaballerini) on Jan 26, 2016 at 6:49am PST

End of Instagram post by kelseaballerini

“I could not get into a room with a hit writer to save my life,” she recalls of making her first album.

“I was a new girl, on an independent label and those were two strikes against me. No-one would write with me.”

It turned out to be a blessing. Left to her own devices, Ballerini, whose first concert was Britney Spears, channelled her love of pop and R&B into the album, giving her songs a vitality and immediacy that’s sometimes missing from traditional country.

The star’s co-producer, Forest Glen Whitehead, even refers to her as a “country Beyonce”.

“I grew up on a farm in Eastern Tennessee and country is where my roots are,” explains the singer, “but I listen to rap and I listen to R&B and I love pop.

“I’ve always been open about that because, as a songwriter, I always want to make sure that I’m trying new things.”

Image copyrightSony Music / Black River
Image caption The singer moved to Nashville aged 15 with her mother but struggled to be accepted by the country music establishment

Despite the strength of her singles, Ballerini still faced an uphill struggle in the insular world of country.

Her debut came out in the midst of what’s been called “tomato-gate“, where radio consultant Keith Hill advised stations not to play too many songs by women and not to play two women back to back.

“If you want to make ratings in country radio, take females out,” he told trade publication Country Radio Aircheck. “They’re just not the lettuce in our salad. The lettuce is Luke Bryan and Blake Shelton, Keith Urban and artists like that. The tomatoes of our salad are the females.”

Like many others, Ballerini was perplexed by his comments.

“When you think of country music history obviously you have George Jones, Garth Brooks, George Strait – all these iconic males. But you cannot talk about the history of country music without Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton, Shania Twain. I mean some of the biggest artists in country music history are female.”

In the end, she thinks, the uproar over Hill’s comments helped her cause.

“Love Me Like You Mean It was in the top five when tomato-gate came out – and I think radio stations went, ‘Well, watch this!’ and helped me get to number one.”

Image copyrightGetty Images

But how do you follow up such a successful debut? With great difficulty, says Ballerini.

“I didn’t know how to make my second record for a long time.

“The first one worked so well that I was like, ‘How do I make that record again?’ And then I realised I can’t. That’s not who I am any more.”

The answer was simple: Write an album about the person she’s become – and luckily Ballerini had a lot of material to draw on.

No more love songs?

Unapologetically, released this Friday, is the chronological story of the last two years, as the singer left behind a “gross break-up” and got engaged to fellow country singer Morgan Evans.

One of the first tracks is Miss Me More, a slinky stomp in which the singer describes how her ex-boyfriend slowly eroded her identity.

I retired my red lipstick ’cause you said you didn’t like it,” she sings. “I didn’t wear my high heel shoes / ‘Cause I couldn’t be taller than you.”

“In a lot of young relationships, you fall in love for the first time and you give every part of yourself to make it work,” she explains. “But sometimes, when it’s not treated right, that’s how you lose yourself.

“I think it’s really a beautiful moment when you get to the other side, and you’re looking in the mirror and you’re like, ‘Huh, I thought I was going to miss him but – actually – I miss me!'”

Image copyrightGetty Images
Image caption Ballerini will duet with Reba McIntyre at next week’s CMA Awards

Ballerini says she found it easier to write those “super dark” lyrics than the love songs that close the album. In fact, she’s so bad at the soppy stuff that she came up with a track called I Hate Love Songs.

A pastiche of saccharine 1950s doo-wop hits, it opens with the lyric: “I hate Shakespeare and Gosling and cakes with white frosting.”

“Do I really hate Ryan Gosling? Lord no!” she screeches. “He’s a beautiful man!

“But I love that song. It talks about that heart and head battle. I don’t want to be a cliched person in love; but I kind of am turning into that.

“Then the next song [on the album] is Unapologetically, where it’s finally like I’m fully in love. I love the tension of those two together.”

With its pop leanings and infectiously catchy choruses, Unapologetically looks destined to bring Ballerini to a wider audience – and the UK in particular.

Lead single Legends has been playlisted by BBC Radio 2, while the singer is booked to play the Country to Country festival in London and Glasgow next March.

She’ll also perform a duet with country legend Reba McIntyre (“it’s going to be so cool”) at the CMA Awards, which will be screened later in the month on BBC Four.

Just don’t expect Ballerini to stop being star-struck as her own star rises.

“I still freak out when I’m around Carrie Underwood,” she laughs, “and now I see her all the time.”

Unapologetically is released on Friday, 3 November. Highlights of the CMA Awards will be broadcast on BBC Radio 2 on Sunday, 11 November and later in the month on BBC Four.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

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New Banksy work unveiled at ‘apology’ party for Palestinians

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An actor dressed as Queen Elizabeth II unveiled a new work by UK artist Banksy, etched into Israel’s controversial West Bank barrier.

The carving reads “Er… Sorry”, alluding to the centenary of the 1917 Balfour Declaration, in which Britain expressed its support for a Jewish national home.

Israel and Jewish communities view the pledge as momentous, while Palestinians regard it as a historical injustice.

The unveiling was part of Banksy’s mock tea party, attended by children from nearby Palestinian refugee camps.

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Rihanna raps (and slays) on NERD’s comeback single

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Pharell and RihannaImage copyrightGetty Images
Image caption This is the first time Pharrell and Rihanna have appeared together in a song

Rihanna may not have released an album this year, but she’s never been bigger.

Wild Thoughts, her collaboration with DJ Khaled, was one of the songs of the summer; while her new beauty line was valued at $72m in the space of a month.

Her costume for the Crop Over festival in Barbados almost broke the internet; and she’s taken a starring role in the all-female reboot of Ocean’s Eleven.

Now she’s delivered one of the performances of her career on NERD’s comeback single, Lemon.

It’s the first new music from Pharrell Williams’ band since 2017, and it features a fierce rap from the Bajan star, who boasts: “I get it how I live it / I live it how I get it”.

And, in what could be a reference to Beyonce’s hit album Lemonade, she adds: “I pull up with a lemon… your eyes get acidic”.

Image copyrightVirgin Records
Image caption A “tutorial video” accompanying the song sees Rihanna shaving the hair off a young model

Throughout the song, Pharrell’s production is brutally minimalistic – but the sparse electro-hip-hop beat gives Rihanna plenty of space to exploit her “Bad Girl” persona.

“This beat tastes like lunch,” she exclaims, perplexingly, towards the end of her verse.

Not for the first time, Rihanna’s vocal prompts a re-evaluation of her as a performer (See also: Her stunning rendition of Love On The Brain at last year’s Billboard Music Awards).

Although she has toyed with rap in the past – notably on the censor-baiting single Better Have My Money and Kendrick Lamar’s track Loyalty – she’s tended to sing-speak her contributions rather than compete with collaborators like Kanye West, Nicki Minaj and Jay-Z.

On Lemon, though, the tables are turned: Pharrell’s reprise of Rihanna’s lyrics seems unnecessary and half-baked.

Image copyrightDriely S.
Image caption NERD (L-R): Chad Hugo, Shay Haley, Pharrell Williams

Still, the single is a confident return for NERD, who started life as a side project for Pharrell and Chad Hugo’s production outfit The Neptunes in 2001.

The band never quite attained the profile of their most prominent member, who has scored major hits with Happy, Blurred Lines and Get Lucky.

Their sound is more abrasive than Pharrell’s solo work, taking its cues from funk and rock, but they reached the UK Top 10 in 2007 with She Wants To Move.

Over the weekend, the band teased their return with posters reading “No-one Ever Really Dies” at a US music festival (the band’s name is an acronym of the phrase).

Lemon premiered on Beats 1 Radio days before NERD headline the Los Angeles hip-hop festival Complexcon alongside Gucci Mane and Young Thug.

It’s accompanied by a “tutorial video” in which Rihanna is seen shaving the head of a model, who goes on to dance to the track.

According to a Rihanna fan account on Twitter, the star was recently spotted on the set of a music video with Pharrell, raising the prospect of a full music video at a later date.

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Dustin Hoffman accused of teen sex assault

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Anna Graham Hunter, now an author, claims she was groped on several occasions by the actor while she worked as a production assistant on the 1985 film Death Of A Salesman.

Hoffman, now 80, is said to have spoken openly about sex with the then 17-year-old, and allegedly told her he wanted a “hard-boiled egg and a soft-boiled clitoris” when she took his breakfast order.

She alleges the actor grabbed her bottom on multiple occasions, despite her slapping his hand away and telling him he was a “dirty old man”.

Former intern details Dustin Hoffman’s alleged sexual harassment on set in 1985: “My heart aches” https://t.co/4MPYKsRFCA

— Hollywood Reporter (@THR) November 1, 2017

Writing for Hollywood Reporter, Ms Hunter said: “At 49, I understand what Dustin Hoffman did as it fits into the larger pattern of what women experience in Hollywood and everywhere.

“He was a predator, I was a child, and this was sexual harassment.”

Diary entries she shared from the time also suggest he told another assistant he wanted her “right breast” for lunch.

Dustin Hoffman in Death of a Salesman in 1985
Image:Dustin Hoffman in Death Of A Salesman in 1985

In a statement to Hollywood Reporter, Hoffman said: “I have the utmost respect for women and feel terrible that anything I might have done could have put her in an uncomfortable situation. I am sorry. It is not reflective of who I am.”

Since allegations against Harvey Weinstein surfaced, Jeremy Piven and Kevin Spacey have also been accused of sexual harassment by men and women in Hollywood.

Piven has denied the allegations against him – describing them as “appalling”.

In response to claims made by Anthony Rapp, Spacey issued an apology and said he did not recall the incident, which was alleged to have happened in 1986.

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Arise Sir Billy: Comedian Connolly knighted

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The 75-year-old Scottish actor admitted it was “kind of weird” to receive the honour.

Sir Billy was knighted by Prince Charles for services to entertainment and charity during a ceremony at Buckingham Palace.

He said he first saw “Sir Billy” written in a newspaper in Scotland, and it “took [his] breath away”.

Speaking after the ceremony, the British comedian and actor, who announced in 2013 that he had Parkinson’s disease, said the condition means he has to adapt the way he approaches things now.

Billy Connolly is getting a knighthood
Image:The comedian said seeing ‘Sir Billy’ written for the first time was ‘kind of weird’

“Today for instance my main worry was when I knelt down to get the sword would I get back up? And then I saw there was a handle on the stool and I thought ‘Oh great.’,” he said.

“But that would never have crossed my mind before. It’s kind of … making sure my hands don’t shake when I’m in a peculiar position.”

The Glasgow-born star, who is famous for his razor-sharp stand-up comedy performances, said he is now happy to be a part of the establishment.

“I’m very comfortable with it. The counterculture thing is kind of wearing,” he said.

“It’s not the shock I thought it might have been.”

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