Entertainment

Elisabeth Moss had a secret message ‘to the patriarchy’ in her Emmys outfit

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Elisabeth Moss at the EmmysImage copyrightReuters
Image caption There were words on Moss’s outfit that no-one saw on the red carpet

Elisabeth Moss’s stylist has revealed there was a hidden message “to the patriarchy” in the actress’s Emmy Awards outfit.

Moss won best actress in a drama series for The Handmaid’s Tale on Sunday.

But what no-one noticed was the message written on the bottom of her shoes.

Stylist Karla Welch posted a photo of one shoe with “Off” written on the sole. “You’ll have to guess what the other shoe says.” she wrote. “Our note to the patriarchy #teamresistance.”

Image copyrightInstagram @karlawelchstylist

That’s partly a reference to the dystopian drama for which Moss won her award, in which handmaids are slaves forced to bear children for powerful families.

They are given names combining “Of” with the first name of their male custodian – so the name of Moss’s character is Offred.

But most people have assumed the other shoe may have borne a word to send a message to a real-world patriarchy in Hollywood and beyond.

Speaking after her win, she said it was important for stories to be led by and made by women.

“It’s my bread and butter, it’s what I’m most interested in as a woman, shows that are about women,” she said.

Moss also said there’s “still a lot of work to be done”, adding: “There are still meetings you walk into and you wonder if they say ‘no’ because it’s a show or film led by a woman.”

Moss paired the customised Olgana Paris heels with a pale pink Prabal Gurung gown.

She also used the awards ceremony to send a more overt message to two women – firstly her mother, whom she credited in her acceptance speech with being “brave and strong and smart”.

Image copyrightGetty Images
Image caption Moss called author Margaret Atwood (right) “a champion, a heroine, a rebel, and a fighter”

Then the actress posted a message to author Margaret Atwood, whose 1985 novel The Handmaid’s Tale was adapted for TV.

Moss wrote: “She has provided a voice to so many who could not use their own, she has given us her heart and soul as readers, she has asked us to wake up and not only look around but to act and resist.

“She is a champion, a heroine, a rebel, and a fighter for freedom and equality.”

Meanwhile, hot on those heels, it was reported that Moss has signed to star in a film about an underground suburban network of women who provided safe abortions in the 1960s.

The actress will play a married Chicago woman who becomes pregnant in Call Jane, based on the true story of a 1960s movement called the Jane Collective, according to The Hollywood Reporter.


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Learning 9 to 3: Dolly Parton releasing kids’ album

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The 14-track record will be titled I Believe In You, and will be released as part of Parton’s non-profit literacy organisation Imagination Library.

The 71-year-old singer has said all proceeds from album sales will be used to buy books for children from birth to five years old.

Dolly Parton pictured in London as part of a 1977 tour
Image:Dolly Parton pictured in London as part of a 1977 tour

“It’s been 20 years since the Imagination Library was launched,” Parton said.

“We’ve seen 100 million books get into the hands of children and hopefully there will be many more.”

This year marks half a century since her debut as a country singer in the 1967 album Hello, I’m Dolly.

“My first album was released 50 years ago and it’s been an amazing 50 years since then.

“I am very excited that now I’m coming out with my first children’s album in all of those 50 years.”

I Believe In You will be released in the UK on 13 October.

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Could Kingsman star be the next James Bond?

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At the London premiere of Kingsman: The Golden Circle, actor Taron Egerton said it would be “amazing” to play James Bond.

The 27-year-old star rose to fame playing unlikely spy Gary ‘Eggsy’ Unwin in the first of Matthew Vaughn’s action-packed films, and has since been hailed as a fresh alternative to old-school 007.

Taron Egerton
Image:Taron Egerton plays unlikely spy Eggsy in the two Kingsman films

“I don’t know how much better he is – I think he’s quite a nice alternative,” Egerton said of his character as he walked the red carpet.

“Bond is eternally super-cool and clean cut and sharp; Eggsy is too, but Eggsy doesn’t always get it right and I think that’s the fun of Eggsy, he’s not quite formed yet.

“Maybe one day he’ll be James Bond, but for now, he isn’t.”

Kingsman The Golden Circle

Video:Watch the new trailer for Kingsman: The Golden Circle

But could Egerton prove to be a double agent? Would he swap sides to enter a more prestigious franchise?

“If I was asked, yeah. Yeah, amazing.”

It might come as shocking news to Kingsman fans – and creator Mark Millar and director Matthew Vaughn, who managed to gather an impressive cast this time around.

Jeff Bridges, Channing Tatum, Julianne Moore, Halle Berry and Pedro Pascal join the likes of Colin Firth and Mark Strong.

CHANNING TATUM

Video:Tatum advice: G-strings, cowboy hats and hot sauce

“It’s kind of indescribable what was so good about the first movie – it was just so fresh and punk-rock,” said Tatum at the premiere.

He said the new film provided “an assault from the very beginning, I can guarantee you”.

So far, reviews have been positive, with many critics praising the over-stylised, ultra-violent approach to a spy thriller.

Others have questioned the return of Firth – whose character was apparently killed in the first film.

JEFF BRIDGES

Video:Kingsman stars on playing with Elton John

“Matthew included me in his thinking enough that I knew he could imagine three,” said Firth said, revealing the director is already planning a third film.

For now, Kingsman: The Golden Circle opens in the UK this week, and Eggsy will remain Eggsy – at least until Daniel Craig retires.

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Noma Dumezweni on Cursed Child’s next steps

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Noma Dumezweni
Image caption Noma Dumezweni attended The Stage Debut Awards on Sunday

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is gearing up to transfer to Broadway after a hugely successful run in London’s West End.

Noma Dumezweni, who played Hermione in the original London production, is among the original cast members set to reprise her role across the Atlantic from March.

The actress attended The Stage Debut Awards on Sunday and told BBC News that one of the aspects of Cursed Child she’s most proud of is bringing theatre to a new audience.

“What I understood for London was that 60 or 65% of the audience were first-time theatregoers, because of those [Harry Potter] books,” she said.

“And you go, OK, you’ve read the books, seen the films, and now I love that it’s in script form – all those people with scripts of the Cursed Child will now go and play those parts in their garden.

“It’s now there to create your version. So the through line is huge.”

Image copyrightCharlie Gray
Image caption Noma starred alongside Paul Thornley and Cherrelle Skeete in Cursed Child

Noma added that her 10-year-old daughter’s enthusiasm for Harry Potter reassured her of the franchise’s enduring popularity.

“To go to the theatre, with that percentage of people being first-time theatregoers, that’s phenomenal, it’s quite special and I’m part of it.”

The actress said she has “no idea” whether changes will be made to the show ahead of its Broadway transfer, but added: “I’m so excited for it.”

Along with several members of the principal cast, Noma has now left the London production before she reprises her role in the US from March 2018.

“I went to see the new [London] cast, with Rakie Ayola playing Hermione, and I loved it,” the actress said.

Image caption Noma was one of the celebrity narrators on BBC Radio 2’s 500 Words project

“I went, ‘Oh my God they’re doing their own thing’, and within that there were little changes, and I thought, yes, that makes sense.

“And I said to Rakie, ‘I’m totally stealing some of your stuff, because I really enjoy what you do’. But that’s the highest compliment I can give her, as an actress to another actress, I love what she did.”

Noma added that she may well make some changes of her own when she returns to the role next year.

“Hopefully there’ll be room for us to expand. The first time I was at the Royal Shakespeare Company was to do The Winter’s Tale, and I came back to it nine months later.

Skip Twitter post by @BBCNewsEnts

#CursedChild star Anthony Boyle says “anything @JK_Rowling touches turns to gold, she’s incredible” @TheStagepic.twitter.com/sUuP3XpuJw

— BBC News Ents Team (@BBCNewsEnts) September 17, 2017

End of Twitter post by @BBCNewsEnts

“And because of the world you’ve lived in for those nine months, it adds another texture, another way of thinking to what you’ve already got.

“I came back nine months later and felt, ‘Woah, I’ve grown’, so I’m looking forward to the growing of my Hermione when we do Broadway.”

The actress was speaking to the BBC at the first ever Stage Debut Awards, which was also attended by her fellow cast member Anthony Boyle. But she pointed out that such an event is “not just about young people”.

“We’re all doing our thing, we all started somewhere,” she said.

“I did fringe theatre for so many years, and then I got my first play at the RSC, which was an amazing feeling, but I was 30 and had started acting in my early twenties.

Image copyrightCharlie Gray
Image caption Noma will reprise her role as Hermione on Broadway from March 2018

“I have been that actor who’s watched peers and thought ‘God, they’re doing well, I’ll never get there.

“For me, you could say my big West End debut was Cursed Child, but I’m in my 40s, and it’s like, when is that beginning? To acknowledge the beginnings of people is a beautiful thing.”

She added: “I want the Stage Debut Awards to still be here in 20 years seeing how it goes.

“You’ve got so many people doing so many different things, and it’s not just London-centric. It’s looking around the country and saying, ‘We are seeing you’, and I’m really excited that this has begun.”


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Noma Dumezweni on Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’s next steps

E4y.net
Noma Dumezweni
Image caption Noma Dumezweni attended The Stage Debut Awards on Sunday

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is gearing up to transfer to Broadway after a hugely successful run in London’s West End.

Noma Dumezweni, who played Hermione in the original London production, is among the original cast members set to reprise her role across the Atlantic from March.

The actress attended The Stage Debut Awards on Sunday and told BBC News that one of the aspects of Cursed Child she’s most proud of is bringing theatre to a new audience.

“What I understood for London was that 60 or 65% of the audience were first-time theatregoers, because of those [Harry Potter] books,” she said.

“And you go, OK, you’ve read the books, seen the films, and now I love that it’s in script form – all those people with scripts of the Cursed Child will now go and play those parts in their garden.

“It’s now there to create your version. So the through line is huge.”

Image copyrightCharlie Gray
Image caption Noma starred alongside Paul Thornley and Cherrelle Skeete in Cursed Child

Noma added that her 10-year-old daughter’s enthusiasm for Harry Potter reassured her of the franchise’s enduring popularity.

“To go to the theatre, with that percentage of people being first-time theatregoers, that’s phenomenal, it’s quite special and I’m part of it.”

The actress said she has “no idea” whether changes will be made to the show ahead of its Broadway transfer, but added: “I’m so excited for it.”

Along with several members of the principal cast, Noma has now left the London production before she reprises her role in the US from March 2018.

“I went to see the new [London] cast, with Rakie Ayola playing Hermione, and I loved it,” the actress said.

Image caption Noma was one of the celebrity narrators on BBC Radio 2’s 500 Words project

“I went, ‘Oh my God they’re doing their own thing’, and within that there were little changes, and I thought, yes, that makes sense.

“And I said to Rakie, ‘I’m totally stealing some of your stuff, because I really enjoy what you do’. But that’s the highest compliment I can give her, as an actress to another actress, I love what she did.”

Noma added that she may well make some changes of her own when she returns to the role next year.

“Hopefully there’ll be room for us to expand. The first time I was at the Royal Shakespeare Company was to do The Winter’s Tale, and I came back to it nine months later.

Skip Twitter post by @BBCNewsEnts

#CursedChild star Anthony Boyle says “anything @JK_Rowling touches turns to gold, she’s incredible” @TheStagepic.twitter.com/sUuP3XpuJw

— BBC News Ents Team (@BBCNewsEnts) September 17, 2017

End of Twitter post by @BBCNewsEnts

“And because of the world you’ve lived in for those nine months, it adds another texture, another way of thinking to what you’ve already got.

“I came back nine months later and felt, ‘Woah, I’ve grown’, so I’m looking forward to the growing of my Hermione when we do Broadway.”

The actress was speaking to the BBC at the first ever Stage Debut Awards, which was also attended by her fellow cast member Anthony Boyle. But she pointed out that such an event is “not just about young people”.

“We’re all doing our thing, we all started somewhere,” she said.

“I did fringe theatre for so many years, and then I got my first play at the RSC, which was an amazing feeling, but I was 30 and had started acting in my early twenties.

Image copyrightCharlie Gray
Image caption Noma will reprise her role as Hermione on Broadway from March 2018

“I have been that actor who’s watched peers and thought ‘God, they’re doing well, I’ll never get there.

“For me, you could say my big West End debut was Cursed Child, but I’m in my 40s, and it’s like, when is that beginning? To acknowledge the beginnings of people is a beautiful thing.”

She added: “I want the Stage Debut Awards to still be here in 20 years seeing how it goes.

“You’ve got so many people doing so many different things, and it’s not just London-centric. It’s looking around the country and saying, ‘We are seeing you’, and I’m really excited that this has begun.”


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Food in a fragile world

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A cow passes in front of the backdrop whilst a shoot takes place.Image copyrightChris de Bode

In sub-Saharan Africa, conflict and climate change have had a major impact on food security. Communities in Niger, Burundi and Central African Republic are experiencing dangerous levels of hunger and malnutrition.

Chris de Bode visited these places, bringing a backdrop to create photographs that blend studio portraits with documentary.

As well as exploring how political and environmental instability can reduce people’s ability to grow or buy food, de Bode also shows how charitable interventions can help.

A young man holds up his tools.Image copyrightChris de Bode

Twenty-eight year-old Daniel Nsabiyaremye had the skills to be a carpenter but lacked the tools. After a series of loans that he spent on a hammer, spanners, saw, plane and a square set, he was able to launch his now thriving business.

“I bought the tools, one by one, from the money transfers I received,” he says.

“Now, I don’t lack the means to put food on the table. Before the programme, we used to eat once a day – and often it was a poor meal, consisting of cassava leaves and green bananas. Now we eat twice a day. It has meant a positive change in the health of my children and me.”

Two men stand in front of a backdrop.Image copyrightChris de Bode
A group sit in front of a backdrop.Image copyrightChris de Bode

Joseph and Nyambaronziza are both members of the marginalised Batwa community. The Batwa are pygmies, well known for their height – or rather lack of it.

They both struggle to provide for their families living in dilapidated homes on the remote forest hillside in Kabere, Uganda. They earn money from occasional labour, cultivating land or looking for gold in the nearby river.

A woman picks plants.Image copyrightChris de Bode
A bowl of beansImage copyrightChris de Bode
A family stand next to their house.Image copyrightChris de Bode

Denise Nyamwiza, 20, is responsible for her younger siblings after their parents died of malaria two years ago.

She searches for casual labour and sometime makes money from selling avocados and ground sunflower seeds that she grows on her small plot of land.

Solange Wanibilo stands with her extended family, outside their home in the village of Bomandoro, Central African Republic. Solange’s youngest child Arthur and her grandchild Frank are both malnourished.

A family stand in front of their house.Image copyrightChris de Bode
A small boy's arm is measured.Image copyrightChris de Bode
A woman stands with her four children.Image copyrightChris de Bode

Golden Marlenue stands outside her home with her four young children.

Her two youngest children Naomi, two and Athanase, 12 months, are both malnourished. However, three weeks ago the nearby Ndanga Health Post was reopened so that the children can now get the treatment and support they need.

Light streams into a woman's house.Image copyrightChris de Bode
A plant pushes through the soil.Image copyrightChris de Bode
A group sit in a field.Image copyrightChris de Bode

In Boganando, Central African Republic, Josephine Zawele stands in a farmer’s field school alongside other members of her community. This field school is used by local farmers to learn new agricultural techniques that they can then replicate on their own land.

Hadijatou Cheihou, 15, lives in the Nigerien village of Gao Moussa, which has become well known locally as a fine producer of groundnut oil. Hadijatou is an original member of a group of 30 women who were trained in the production of the oil.

Now more than 90 women in the village are involved. The oil is so sought after that people travel from more than 45 km (28 miles) to purchase it.

A woman stands in her village.Image copyrightChris de Bode
Legs of a family.Image copyrightChris de Bode
A woman smiles out from a group.Image copyrightChris de Bode

In Kosama, Niger, Hassana Abdourahamane smiles alongside other members of a community farming group.

On land loaned to the women, they grow vegetables including onions, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, cabbage and aubergines. Initial seeds and training were provided by a charity called Concern, but the women are now self-sufficient because they are able to sell some of what they grow.

A bundle of vegetables.Image copyrightChris de Bode
A farmer holds a child.Image copyrightChris de Bode
A farmer stands amongst his animals.Image copyrightChris de Bode

Salifou Ahment, a 70-year-old farmer, used to struggle to feed his livestock during the dry season when grassland becomes scarce.

Now, instead of having to travel miles to buy food, there is an animal feed bank a short walk from his home. The bank, run by the community, keeps animal feed in stock all year round and sells to local farmers at a fair and affordable price.

A dusty cup.Image copyrightChris de Bode

The photographs can be viewed in the courtyard of St Martin-in-the-Fields near Trafalgar Square, London from 19 September.

The exhibition has been produced by overseas aid agency Concern Worldwide and Panos Pictures.

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Strictly Come Dancing: Judge Rinder rejects same-sex dance pairings

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Judge RinderImage copyrightPA
Image caption Judge Rinder is the latest Strictly participant to comment on the same-sex debate

Strictly Come Dancing shouldn’t have same-sex couples because it would “politicise” the show, according to former contestant Judge Rinder.

“Would it be a big step forward for the LGBTQI community if there were same-sex couples on Strictly? Do me a favour!” he told the Radio Times.

“Some things ain’t politics and Strictly is one of them.”

The debate over whether gay contestants should dance with people of the same gender has been a talking point.

Comedian Susan Calman said she received criticism on social media for taking part in the BBC One show because it doesn’t have same-sex dancing couples.

“There will be a time for same-sex dancing,” she told the BBC. “I think what annoyed me slightly is that I seem to be getting it in the neck.”

Image caption The judge turned TV personality danced with Oksana Platero last year

The Reverend Richard Coles, another of this year’s celebrity hopefuls, said he would be happy to dance with a man.

Judge Craig Revel Horwood, meanwhile, has said there will “probably” be same-sex couples on next year’s edition.

According to Robert Rinder, however, a contestant’s dance partner on Strictly should have nothing to do with sexual orientation.

The criminal barrister turned daytime TV personality danced with Ukrainian professional Oksana Platero on the show last year.

“One of the first questions I was asked when I joined Strictly Come Dancing last year was, ‘Ooh, how come you’re dancing with a woman?'” he said.

Image caption Susan Calman will dance with Kevin Clifton on this year’s show

“The answer was always, ‘What a thoroughly absurd question!’ My sexuality, in terms of Strictly or whatever else I do in my life, ought to be as irrelevant as the length of my big toe.

“The reality is that ballroom dancing is a professional sport, and the dancers are athletes who have competed at the highest level.

“I soon realised that for Oksana it was like playing tennis at Wimbledon. And just like in tennis, there are ballroom championships and rankings.

“Nobody would dream of asking gay players in the mixed doubles to be partnered with someone of the same sex.

Image caption The Reverend Richard Coles has been partnered with Australia’s Dianne Buswell

“There are plenty of organisations making a real difference to the lives of gay people around the country that do need our help, so why undermine the wonder of Strictly by politicising it?”

That said, Judge Rinder said he would be prepared to dance with a male partner as a festive one-off.

“If it would satiate these Twitter trolls, I’ll offer myself up to dance with a man on the Strictly Christmas special,” he told the magazine.

Strictly Come Dancing returns to BBC One on Saturday for the first live show of the 2017 series.


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Facial scans to identify bad Elvises at Porthcawl festival

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Elvis fans in PorthcawlImage copyrightUniversity of South Wales
Image caption Elvis fans enjoying the world’s largest festival in honour of “The King” in Porthcawl, Bridgend

Elvis impersonators will have their faces scanned by police in a bid to catch troublemakers and criminals.

About 35,000 fans of The King are expected to attend the world’s largest Elvis festival in Porthcawl, Bridgend, on 22 September.

South Wales Police will use facial recognition technology – used at the Champions League – to seek out wanted criminals and known troublemakers.

Insp Scott Lloyd said it would help stamp out anti-social behaviour.

The technology was trialled on 3 June at the UEFA Champion’s League Final in Cardiff, with 70,000 fans’ faces scanned and matched against 500,000 “custody images” during the match at the Principality Stadium.

It will be used at the Porthcawl festival, which takes place over three days, to seek out those who have caused problems at the festival in the past.

Officers will then engage with identified suspects “one-to-one” in a bid to help the festival run without any problems.

The force said while people’s privacy would be respected the move would help prevent crime.

Insp Lloyd said: “We want them to enjoy the festival without causing the issues that they may have been involved in during previous years.

“The facial recognition technology is just one of the tools that we will be using to help with preventing crime and disrupting anti-social behaviour at the event,” he added.

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Linkin Park announce Chester Bennington tribute concert

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Linkin ParkImage copyrightReuters
Image caption The gig will be a chance for fans to remember Chester Bennington

US rock band Linkin Park are to hold a special tribute concert in honour of singer Chester Bennington, who killed himself in July at the age of 41.

The gig will be held at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles on 27 October.

A statement on the band’s website promised “an unforgettable night of music to honour the man that touched the lives of so many around the world”.

Linkin Park had been about to start a tour when Bennington, a father of six, took his own life.

The singer had struggled with addiction and had discussed depression and suicide in interviews.

Tickets for the concert, which will feature “a number of other artists”, will go on general sale on Friday.

Formed in 1996, Linkin Park have sold more than 70 million albums worldwide and have won two Grammys.


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